The Lurking Horror

In the midst of this beastly summer we’ve just entered, nothing seems farther away than the lung-clenching air of winter. When things are this hot, and pools and popsicles fail to cool, there’s one foolproof way to get into the spirit of winter: The Lurking Horror. … you practically froze to death slogging over here from the dorm. Not to mention jumping at every shadow, what with all the recent disappearances.
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WebAssembly is the Keystone

Within the last two days, WebAssembly (wasm) has graced the eyeballs of every JavaScript developer. If wasm is new to you, the articles linked at the end of this post fully describe what wasm is. Since that’s been covered, I’d like to talk about one impact wasm will hopefully have on future of computing. To set the scene, a quote from the man himself: Meanwhile, I took one quick step that would demonstrate the concept of the Web as a universal, all-encompassing space.
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Naming Names - Anonymity is Dead

Naming things is hard enough, and JavaScript doesn’t make it any easier. Should anonymous functions be considered harmful?
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DiMo: Particles

Dimo: Particles is an artistic particle physics simulation and interactive art exhibit I created (along with fellow Red Hat engineers Ian Hands and Ben Pritchett) for the SPARKcon festival in 2014. Launch live demo! Pictures These pictures are from the art exhibit at geekSPARK in 2014. $GALLERY After the event, I wrote this opensource.com article about the experience. The source code is, of course, open.
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Pale Blue Pixel

Pale Blue Pixel is this blog. I write technical posts about web development image processing amateur graphics and generally celebrating the art and craft of programming. The name Pale Blue Pixel is a meek tribute to Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot. It’s currently powered by: Python - a large and powerful snake Pelican - an awkwardly-shaped sea bird CSS Grid - framework-free CSS thanks to grid and flexbox LESS - CSS preprocessor GitHub pages - hosting
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RGB WebGL Color Cube

I spent a bit of time this weekend building an RGB color cube for ColorPal, using Three.js. Drag and drop any image, and you’ll see a cube with all the pixels of your image mapped into 3D space. Launch live demo! and view the code. Your web browser must support WebGL, which at this point in history means a fairly recent Firefox or Chrome. In case your web browser doesn’t support WebGL, here’s a video to enjoy while you download Firefox Nightly.
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Drop64

Drop64 is an easy drag-and-drop tool for generating Data URIs from any file. Check it out at drop64.com. Here’s a demo recording of how easy it is. Some benefits of Data URIs are: Fewer HTTP requests means faster page loads avoid cross-origin resource loading issues (fonts in Firefox, for example) you can paste the Data URI directly into your web browser URL bar to view the file (occasionally convenient) If you noticed the similarity to ColorPal, well done!
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ColorPal CLI!

Tired of creating color palettes with ColorPal’s simple, intuitive drag-and-drop interface? Me too! Use this handy command instead.
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